Affordability

Habitat for Humanity of Durham is able to keep housing costs low because of our partnerships with homeowners, donor investors, and institutional partners.

Start-up capital

We depend on generous neighbors like you to provide start-up capital for each of our construction projects. A $50,000 investment starts one new home project, and a $2,500 investment funds one home repair project. Learn more about giving a donation that will invest in our work.

Mortgages and repayments

Habitat for Humanity does not give houses away. We provide each of our partner families with a zero-percent mortgage with generous help from the City of Durham. Habitat homeowners invest their own resources, at an affordable level, in their home or repair project. Their monthly mortgage payments go into a revolving fund and are used to build more Habitat for Humanity houses.

Government and corporate partnerships

The City of Durham generously provides $20,000 second mortgages to many of our homeowners, and the North Carolina Housing Finance Agency subsidizes some of our homeowners' first mortgages. Durham Habitat uses government funds from the City of Durham and the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development to purchase property at a reduced rate. Also, we use donated building materials as gifts-in-kind from corporate partners.

Sweat equity and Volunteer labor

Sweat equityIn lieu of a down payment, Durham Habitat families must put in at least 250 hours of their own time, helping to build or renovate their own home and other homes in the community. This reduces the costs, increases their sense of ownership and self-esteem, and also builds community.

Each year, nearly 5,000 volunteers provide more than 25,000 hours of service to build and renovate 40+ homes. This gift of time saves Durham Habitat more than $325,000 in labor costs each year. Learn more about volunteering with us.

Habitat Success Stories

Lal is a Burmese refugee who came to Durham after stops in Egypt and Thailand. Lal partnered with Habitat and the Durham Literacy Center to renovate a historic home in East Durham. “There is no more fear,” Lal said. “We won’t have to move again because the home belongs to us.”

Lal